1178 Broadway -- Burlingame, California 94010
Telephone 650-343-0182



HOURS:
Monday 9-7 Tuesday-Saturday 9-7:30
Closed Sundays.



Inquire About A Wine--Gerald at Weimax.com


Please check our Home-Page for Shipping Info.


Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Sporadic Emails

For Email Marketing you can trust

 

NICE LITTLE PINOT $9.99

STONY RIESLING

BLAYE ME!
$14.99

NEW MADIRAN
$14.99

DRY MUSCAT
FROM AOSTA

I'M OKAY
YOUR RUCHE

"TEXTBOOK" CHARDONNAY

RIOJA BARGAIN

PRETTY PETTY SARAH

FORAGING FOR PINOT NOIR

MARSELAN...A HYBRID OF CABERNET & GRENACHE

CLASSIC MACON $13.99

CRISP MOUNTAIN WHITE

BEST BUYS
Good Wines for $5-$15

CASTELÃO BARGAIN

CAMILLES SAVÉS
CHAMPAGNE

BIODYNAMIC ROSÉ CHAMPAGNE

STELLAR BLAUFRÄNKISCH ESTATE

GREAT YOUNG CABERNET

CAMPANIAN DELIGHTS

COLORFUL ZIN

23 TO BUY 25 REASONS

FIE, FY, FO, FUM

ROMORANTIN

DOURO DYNAMITE

BOUZY BENOIT'S ROSE

CHATEAU DE PHONE BILL

PORTUGUESE RED BARGAIN

SPIFFY HOWELL MOUNTAIN CAB

BARGAIN ZWEIGELT

GRAND SYRAH FROM AN UNUSUAL PLACE

SERIOUSLY FINE KIWI SAUVIGNON BLANC
$21.99

SPICY AGLIANICO

PURPLE DWARF--
BIG FRENCH RED

OLD "CURE" FOR SAUTERNES & POMEROL

WHITE BURGUNDIES OF NOTE

MARSANNE BARGAIN

CHERRYISH TUSCAN RED SALE $10.99

2012 TAVEL ROSE

WHAT'S A SAVUTO?

GOOD $20 BORDEAUX

DRY NEW YORK RIESLING

PROSECCO FOR ADULTS

UNUSUAL ROSSO FROM THE COLLINE NOVARESI

MIGHTY FINE
DOURO RED

BILLIONAIRE'S WINES UNDER $30!

BARGAIN WHITE BORDEAUX

PIERCINGLY GOOD
WHITE

TOP OF THE LINE
CREMANT

ANOTHER RULLY GOOD WHITE

UNIQUE BUBBLY DESSERT WINE

RESERVE QUALITY RIOJA

ODDBALL ITALIAN FIZZY WINE

LA INA SHERRY

BARBERA OF NOTE

FINE WEST COAST VIOGNIER

LETTUCE SHOW YOU A GOOD PINOT NOIR

NEW, ARTISAN PINOT NOIR

PALACIOS TERRASSES

UPHILL ECONOMY
DOWNHILL WINE

NAPA ZIN SALE

PINOT PILGRIMAGE

SUPER VERONESE SALE $12.99

PIEMONTE'S GRAND VIN BIANCO?

WHITE BURGUNDY OF NOTE

TASTES LIKE
SUMMER-IN-A-BOTTLE

GAMAY FROM THE FRENCH ALPS

A PAIR OF PORTUGUESE RED WINE VALUES

DELICIOUS, FRESH ROSÉS

GREAT GRUNER VELTLINER

TIMELY WINES,
SECOND TO NONE

GOOD ELEVEN-BUCK CHIANTI

NICE TEN-BUCK PINOT NOIR

FLOWERY, CURIOUS RED

OLD FAVORITE KIWI SAUVIGNON IS BACK

OLD PATCH RED
ZIN BLEND

MONCUIT'S GRAND CRU CHAMPAGNE

HONEYED MUSCAT

SPICY 
GEWÜRZTRAMINER

Napa Valley Grape Info
2002

2010

Amazing FRENCH CIDERS

FIZZY LAMBRUSCO

 

 

HOME PAGE

AMERICAN WINES

CALIFORNIA PINOT NOIRS

RHONE WANNABEES

ZINFANDELS

SAUVIGNON BLANCS

MERLOTS

OREGON WINES

CALIFORNIA CHARDONNAYS

CALIFORNIA CABERNETS

RIESLING & GEWURZ

WASHINGTON STATE

CANADIAN WINES

Adventuresome  Wines

ROSÉS !!

FRENCH WINES
ALSACE
BEAUJOLAIS
RED BORDEAUX
WHITE BORDEAUX
RED BURGUNDY
WHITE BURGUNDY
RHÔNE VALLEY
THE FRENCH ALPS
SOUTH OF FRANCE

LOIRE


CHAMPAGNE

 

ITALIAN WINES
PIEMONTE

VALLE D'AOSTA

NORTHERN ITALY

CENTRAL ITALIA

TUSCANY

SOUTHERN ITALIA


SPANISH WINES
Spanish Sherry
& Other Delights


PORTUGUESE WINES

SWISS WINES

GERMAN WINES

AUSTRIAN WINES

ARGENTINA

CHILE

AUSTRALIA

NEW ZEALAND

SOUTH AFRICA

OBSCURE WINES

DESSERT WINES

CHAMPAGNES

HALF-BOTTLES

SPIRITS

CIDERS

BEER
Even Real "Bud"!

OTHER STUFF

WINE TASTING

WHAT'S OPEN


UPCOMING TASTINGS

TASTING RESULTS
  
NEWSLETTER

SHIPPING INFO

ETC.

 

TASTING REPORTS

HOW TO ORGANIZE A BLIND-TASTING

BLIND TASTING ARCHIVE

MY 2013 EURO WINE ADVENTURE BOOK

CHATEAU MONTELENA
VERTICAL


ALBA WINES EXHIBITION 2007

ALBA WINES EXHIBITION 2008

SCHRAMSBERG vs THE FAMOUS FRENCH

German Wine "Master Class" Tasting

S & M FOR WINETASTING GEEKS

TEAR-WAH
TASTING

2013 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2012 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2011 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2010 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2009 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2008 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
Periodically Amazing

2007 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
The Nose Knows!

2006 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION.
SPIT HAPPENS

2005 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION.

2004 SF WINE COMPETITION TASTING

The 2003 SF WINE COMPETITION

2002 SF WINE COMPETITION TASTING 

A Vertical Tasting of Nalle Zinfandels

 

ETC.

RANTINGS & RAVINGS

WINE ROADS of EUROPE

Food/Wine/Friends
A Photo Gallery

MASTER OF WINE ESSAY TOPICS

Old Bottles: A TASTE OF HISTORY

Bob's Venetian Diary

Bob's Paris Notes Updated Spring 2007

Wine Writer's Confession

NEW "CULT" WINERY

Some Restaurant Reviews

HOW TO SELL WINE.
Info For Brokers and
Wine Distributors.

HOW TO HOLD A TRADE TASTING

$100,000 WORTH OF WINE MARKETING ADVICE:  FREE!
Mainly for Foreign Vintners

MOLDY CORKS

Study Reveals Experts Taste More Than What's In the Glass!

OKANAGAN VALLEY WINE TOUR-2010

BRIAN'S 2005 SUMMER VACATION WITH UNCLE

Gerald's Tour de France 2006

GERALD'S TOUR DE FRANCE 2008

A TOUR OF PORTUGAL-2009

HOW TO SPEAK BETTER ITALIAN

PONZI'S 40th
ANNIVERSARY

ROOSEVELT'S 2005 CHILI COOK-OFF

ROOSEVELT'S 2007 CHILI COOK-OFF

Grape Goddess

Ross Bruce Birthday

ALESSIA DALL'U

CCIV

FAQs

BURLINGAME

Links

AUSTRIA

  

Austria is a wonderland for good wines!  But it is known only to those adventuresome souls around the planet who seek good wines and who have no fear of mispronouncing the names of unfamiliar grape varieties.

Though Italy and Spain have, these days, more of the center stage of wine drinkers, it is Austria where the quality of wines has skyrocketed rapidly over the past decade.

Austria had been the home of a major production of sweet wines.  Back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, these were an alternative to the more costly sweet wines from Germany.  But that world is long ago and far away!

The Austrian wine industry was dealt a major blow in 1985 when a scandal nailed a lot of wineries.  One jealous vintner blew the whistle and this sound was heard around the world!  It seems a number of winemakers were adding diethylene glycol to their late-harvest dessert wines as a further measure of sweetening them.  This additive is more commonly found in "anti-freeze," so I suppose it's ironic for it to be appearing in wines which might have been sold as "eisweins" (sweet wines made from grapes frozen on the vine)!

The wineries whose wines were found to have diethylene glycol in them went bankrupt.  The government enacted a strict set of wine regulations, as their wine industry was dealt a major blow.

Over the past 20+ years, a new generation of vintner has taken over the reigns of many family wineries.  They've realized their chances for survival are based on quality winemaking rather than "industrial" production.


There are hundreds and hundreds of wineries in Austria today.  More than 5,000 actually.

Near as I can tell, though there is a major critical publication reviewing Austrian wines, the syndrome we've seen in California of intensifying the wines to court a higher numerical score has not taken hold.  

California vintners (and Australian, French and Italian, for that matter) have upped the ante, continuing to increase levels of alcohol, oak and, sometimes, sugar in their wines in hopes of receiving higher numerical scores.

We first became aware of Austria's wines when a couple of enterprising vintners sent a letter to the Robert Mondavi winery wanting to correspond with Californians in the wine business.  Mondavi forwarded the letter to the winery trade publication called Wines & Vines and we responded to their missive.  Some months later, Josef and Veronika arrived in San Francisco for a vacation and some winery visits.  I was pleased to be able to visit them at their Thermenregion winery a year or two later.

Meeting my Frankfurt-area friends one visit in Austria ages ago, we stopped to taste 50 or 80 wines at the famous Kloster Und.  I didn't find very much of interest, tasting many poor wines.  But a couple stood out and I bought a bottle of wine from a nearby vineyard called "Malat Bründlmayer."  Little did I know, but Norbert & Gaby had planned to visit this place the following day!!!

I was impressed by Malat's wines and these days he's regarded as one of the major leading lights on the Austrian wine scene.  

Today in the San Francisco Bay Area, you'll find many restaurants which feature Austrian wines.  These have excited the local wine cognoscenti, because so many of the wines "work" so well with various cuisines.  

The famous San Francisco restaurant "Slanted Door," which features Viet cuisine, has an outstanding selection which are well-suited to the food.  The fancy and elegant restaurant of Gary Danko also has a lovely range of Austrian wines (I think I stunned the sommelier there when I ordered a bottle without his having to suggest it).

The quality of the wines from Austria continues to improve and the future is very bright for their wines.

Austrian Stats & Terms

Austria has some 113,000 acres of vineyards.  Seventy percent are in white grapes.  The predominant, nearly "national," variety is the Grüner Veltliner,grunervelt.gif (14277 bytes)a grape known to nearly none of our customers.  Something like 29% of Austria's vineyards are Grüner Veltliner (and this percentage has dropped over the past decade as winemakers explore other varieties).

I have tasted hundreds of Grüner Veltliner wines.  I may be the only person in our town to be able to make such a claim.  I can also tell you the quality of this grape can be fascinating and well-suited to pairing with good foods.  One parent of Grüner Veltliner is said to be the Traminer.  And, interestingly, Grüners can age handsomely!  I was in the Kremstal in 2004 and we were presented a "mystery" bottle.  Everyone of the wine professional crowd was impressed by this wine and NOBODY guessed it to be a 50 year old bottle!



A bottle of Mantlerhof Roter Veltliner from the
1954 vintage!
Still youthful, too, at 50 years of age.



Riesling accounts for about 4% of Austrian vineyards (it's grown over the past decade).  Chardonnay, which also goes by the name "Morillon,", has become more prominent, going up from a mere 1% of vineyard plantings to 3.1%!  Sauvignon Blanc has found a home in the Steiermark region where it makes amazingly good wines, easily on par with the best from California and France's Loire Valley.  Pinot Blanc is often labeled as Weissburgunder and some very fine examples are here and there.  

The major red varieties are the Blauer Zweigelt and the Blaufränkisch.  Zweigelt is the most widely planted red grape.  It is cultivated in all 16 wine areas of the country.  It covers about 14.1% of vineyard lands in Austria and is a cross of Blaufränkisch and St. Laurent.
Blaufränkisch, also known as Lemberger, is the second most important red, but possibly the most exciting local variety.  It seems to really thrive in the Mittelburgenland which has been dubbed "Blaufränkischland."  It comprises about 7% of vineyard plantings in Austria.
Cabernet (1.3%) and Pinot Noir (1.4) and Merlot (1.4%) are grown in Austria.  They're just not widely planted.  Syrah (.3% of total vineyard land) shows promise, too.

And Austria has its share of oddball, obscure varieties, too.
Blauer Wildbacher (also known as Schilcher) is found in the Weststeiermark where it makes high acid, lightly pink sparkling wine.  How about Blauer Portugieser?  Or Blauburger (not to be confused with Blauer Burgunder which is Pinot Noir)?  How about Zierfandler (also known as Spätrot)?  Or Rotgipfler?  Goldburger?  Bouvier?


The Regions of Austria

Four major zones with various sub-regions:

1.  BURGENLAND  --  nearly 13,840+ hectares

Sub-regions:  Mittelburgenland, Neusiedlersee, Sudburgenland (this includes a famous wine village called "Rust").

2.  LOWER AUSTRIA  nearly 27,128 hectares  (Known as Niederösterreich)

Sub-regions:  Carnuntum, Donauland, Kamptal, Kremstal, Thermenregion (including the famous wine villages of Gumpoldskirchen and Vöslau), Traisental and the Wachau.

3.  STYRIA --  nearly 4,240 hectares  (Steiermark)

Sub-regions:  Sud-Oststeiermark, Südsteiermark (known as "Austria's Tuscany") and the Weststeiermark.

4.  VIENNA  --  Precisely 612 hectares  (Wien)

If you go there, many wineries are open on some goofy schedule.  These are called "Heurigen" and you can spot them by a pine branch or something similar hanging outside.  They serve their own wines in some form or another.  Sometimes these places offer food, from some sort of Austrian "country" or "peasant" fare to a bag of potato chips.  Wines are offered in a variety of ways;  from wine glasses to tumblers.   On my first visit to Austria, we walked (at the beginning, crawling at the end of the evening) from heurigen to heurigen.  Though we had a full dinner, my host and hostess insisted we have something to eat at each and every heurigen room.  Some Austrians are big people. 

SOME AUSTRIAN SELECTIONS

 

 


The Talented Silvia Heinrich of the J. Heinrich winery in
Deutschkreuz

 

winepour.gif (12696 bytes)Wine Tasting Today

TO INQUIRE ABOUT A WINEgerald@weimax.com
Copyright © 1999 WEIMAX April 23,  2014