1178 Broadway -- Burlingame, California 94010
Telephone 650-343-0182



HOURS:
Monday 9-7 Tuesday-Saturday 9-7:30
Closed Sundays.



Inquire About A Wine--Gerald at Weimax.com


Please check our Home-Page for Shipping Info.


Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Sporadic Emails

For Email Marketing you can trust

 

NICE LITTLE PINOT $9.99

STONY RIESLING

BLAYE ME!
$14.99

NEW MADIRAN
$14.99

DRY MUSCAT
FROM AOSTA

I'M OKAY
YOUR RUCHE

"TEXTBOOK" CHARDONNAY

RIOJA BARGAIN

PRETTY PETTY SARAH

FORAGING FOR PINOT NOIR

MARSELAN...A HYBRID OF CABERNET & GRENACHE

CLASSIC MACON $13.99

CRISP MOUNTAIN WHITE

BEST BUYS
Good Wines for $5-$15

CASTELÃO BARGAIN

CAMILLES SAVÉS
CHAMPAGNE

BIODYNAMIC ROSÉ CHAMPAGNE

STELLAR BLAUFRÄNKISCH ESTATE

GREAT YOUNG CABERNET

CAMPANIAN DELIGHTS

COLORFUL ZIN

23 TO BUY 25 REASONS

FIE, FY, FO, FUM

ROMORANTIN

DOURO DYNAMITE

BOUZY BENOIT'S ROSE

CHATEAU DE PHONE BILL

PORTUGUESE RED BARGAIN

SPIFFY HOWELL MOUNTAIN CAB

BARGAIN ZWEIGELT

GRAND SYRAH FROM AN UNUSUAL PLACE

SERIOUSLY FINE KIWI SAUVIGNON BLANC
$21.99

SPICY AGLIANICO

PURPLE DWARF--
BIG FRENCH RED

OLD "CURE" FOR SAUTERNES & POMEROL

WHITE BURGUNDIES OF NOTE

MARSANNE BARGAIN

CHERRYISH TUSCAN RED SALE $10.99

2012 TAVEL ROSE

WHAT'S A SAVUTO?

GOOD $20 BORDEAUX

DRY NEW YORK RIESLING

PROSECCO FOR ADULTS

UNUSUAL ROSSO FROM THE COLLINE NOVARESI

MIGHTY FINE
DOURO RED

BILLIONAIRE'S WINES UNDER $30!

BARGAIN WHITE BORDEAUX

PIERCINGLY GOOD
WHITE

TOP OF THE LINE
CREMANT

ANOTHER RULLY GOOD WHITE

UNIQUE BUBBLY DESSERT WINE

RESERVE QUALITY RIOJA

ODDBALL ITALIAN FIZZY WINE

LA INA SHERRY

BARBERA OF NOTE

FINE WEST COAST VIOGNIER

LETTUCE SHOW YOU A GOOD PINOT NOIR

NEW, ARTISAN PINOT NOIR

PALACIOS TERRASSES

UPHILL ECONOMY
DOWNHILL WINE

NAPA ZIN SALE

PINOT PILGRIMAGE

SUPER VERONESE SALE $12.99

PIEMONTE'S GRAND VIN BIANCO?

WHITE BURGUNDY OF NOTE

TASTES LIKE
SUMMER-IN-A-BOTTLE

GAMAY FROM THE FRENCH ALPS

A PAIR OF PORTUGUESE RED WINE VALUES

DELICIOUS, FRESH ROSÉS

GREAT GRUNER VELTLINER

TIMELY WINES,
SECOND TO NONE

GOOD ELEVEN-BUCK CHIANTI

NICE TEN-BUCK PINOT NOIR

FLOWERY, CURIOUS RED

OLD FAVORITE KIWI SAUVIGNON IS BACK

OLD PATCH RED
ZIN BLEND

MONCUIT'S GRAND CRU CHAMPAGNE

HONEYED MUSCAT

SPICY 
GEWÜRZTRAMINER

Napa Valley Grape Info
2002

2010

Amazing FRENCH CIDERS

FIZZY LAMBRUSCO

 

 

HOME PAGE

AMERICAN WINES

CALIFORNIA PINOT NOIRS

RHONE WANNABEES

ZINFANDELS

SAUVIGNON BLANCS

MERLOTS

OREGON WINES

CALIFORNIA CHARDONNAYS

CALIFORNIA CABERNETS

RIESLING & GEWURZ

WASHINGTON STATE

CANADIAN WINES

Adventuresome  Wines

ROSÉS !!

FRENCH WINES
ALSACE
BEAUJOLAIS
RED BORDEAUX
WHITE BORDEAUX
RED BURGUNDY
WHITE BURGUNDY
RHÔNE VALLEY
THE FRENCH ALPS
SOUTH OF FRANCE

LOIRE


CHAMPAGNE

 

ITALIAN WINES
PIEMONTE

VALLE D'AOSTA

NORTHERN ITALY

CENTRAL ITALIA

TUSCANY

SOUTHERN ITALIA


SPANISH WINES
Spanish Sherry
& Other Delights


PORTUGUESE WINES

SWISS WINES

GERMAN WINES

AUSTRIAN WINES

ARGENTINA

CHILE

AUSTRALIA

NEW ZEALAND

SOUTH AFRICA

OBSCURE WINES

DESSERT WINES

CHAMPAGNES

HALF-BOTTLES

SPIRITS

CIDERS

BEER
Even Real "Bud"!

OTHER STUFF

WINE TASTING

WHAT'S OPEN


UPCOMING TASTINGS

TASTING RESULTS
  
NEWSLETTER

SHIPPING INFO

ETC.

 

TASTING REPORTS

HOW TO ORGANIZE A BLIND-TASTING

BLIND TASTING ARCHIVE

MY 2013 EURO WINE ADVENTURE BOOK

CHATEAU MONTELENA
VERTICAL


ALBA WINES EXHIBITION 2007

ALBA WINES EXHIBITION 2008

SCHRAMSBERG vs THE FAMOUS FRENCH

German Wine "Master Class" Tasting

S & M FOR WINETASTING GEEKS

TEAR-WAH
TASTING

2013 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2012 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2011 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2010 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2009 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2008 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
Periodically Amazing

2007 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
The Nose Knows!

2006 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION.
SPIT HAPPENS

2005 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION.

2004 SF WINE COMPETITION TASTING

The 2003 SF WINE COMPETITION

2002 SF WINE COMPETITION TASTING 

A Vertical Tasting of Nalle Zinfandels

 

ETC.

RANTINGS & RAVINGS

WINE ROADS of EUROPE

Food/Wine/Friends
A Photo Gallery

MASTER OF WINE ESSAY TOPICS

Old Bottles: A TASTE OF HISTORY

Bob's Venetian Diary

Bob's Paris Notes Updated Spring 2007

Wine Writer's Confession

NEW "CULT" WINERY

Some Restaurant Reviews

HOW TO SELL WINE.
Info For Brokers and
Wine Distributors.

HOW TO HOLD A TRADE TASTING

$100,000 WORTH OF WINE MARKETING ADVICE:  FREE!
Mainly for Foreign Vintners

MOLDY CORKS

Study Reveals Experts Taste More Than What's In the Glass!

OKANAGAN VALLEY WINE TOUR-2010

BRIAN'S 2005 SUMMER VACATION WITH UNCLE

Gerald's Tour de France 2006

GERALD'S TOUR DE FRANCE 2008

A TOUR OF PORTUGAL-2009

HOW TO SPEAK BETTER ITALIAN

PONZI'S 40th
ANNIVERSARY

ROOSEVELT'S 2005 CHILI COOK-OFF

ROOSEVELT'S 2007 CHILI COOK-OFF

Grape Goddess

Ross Bruce Birthday

ALESSIA DALL'U

CCIV

FAQs

BURLINGAME

Links

wpe48.jpg (6647 bytes)

A VENETIAN DIARY

Bob Gorman


Venice is something else! A city, or better, a world unlike any other. For one thing no one is ever quite prepared for the labyrinthine tangle of streets, alleyways, canals, bridges and side streets that make up Venice. I can recall arriving on my first visit one stormy, blustery March evening trying to find our way to the legendary center of Venice: St Marks Square. Turning a corner of what seemed a bizarre series of blind alleyways we came upon this incredible vision. High tide and rain had created this three-inch deep pool of water covering the plaza. It was like a vast expanse of mirror that reflected the lights of the square. Shimmering in that reflected light was that jewel of Venice: St Marks Cathedral, arrayed in Oriental splendor. A series of 17th century baroque palaces elegantly defined the remaining three sides of the square. The bell tower to the right of St Marks rose up seemingly forever, its top obscured by the hovering clouds.

You are suddenly struck by the absence of vehicular traffic in Venice. Alighting from a narrow alleyway or “calle” you enter a small square (“campo”), fountain in the center. You feel like an actor entering a stage set. Further on there is only the constant “lap-lap” of water as it licks the foundations of medieval palaces. Only the occasional whir of the motors of the Vaporettos, the large public taxi-boats which ply the main canals remind you that you are indeed present in the 20th, nay, 21st Century. It is as though Venice emerged, Atlantis-like, from the sea. It is only our modern technology that will eventually prevent it from being engulfed, receding like a legend back into the sea.

Even after several visits you still have to re-orient your way around. Arriving late in the afternoon, refreshing ourselves at the Hotel, we set out to find our selected Restaurant. Our guidebook gave ambiguous directions. Sketchy street maps proved of no avail. (You really need a complete street map to find your way around.) Curiously, you learn to exult in this sense of being lost, this dreamscape that is Venice for there is something of wonderment every step of the way. It is said that in London everything 18th century is old but in Venice everything 18th century is “new.” What a trip!

Turning a corner, finally, “Ecco!” there is our restaurant: Fiaschetteria Toscana. Bottles of wine are shown in the window, Gaja Barbaresco, Tignanello, Solaia, an awesome wine-list and an intriguing menu. Our table is not ready for an hour. No problem for there is time to cross the nearby Rialto Bridge to see the recently cleaned and restored exterior of the Cathedral, with its gleaming multi-colored marble, lapis, and porphyry. Takes your breath away!

Back at Fiaschetteria we are seated and regaled in what seems like the perfection of Venetian cuisine. Old time visitors claim that the restaurant isn’t quite what it used to be but I’m not convinced. A glass of Prosecco gets things under way and first course arrives: a slice of Foie Gras marinated in Picolit, the rich, semi-sweet wine of Friuli, served with a glass of the same unctuous Picolit. Only a drying out old bottle of Chateau d’Yquem could have been better! A main course of Sautéed Veal Kidneys in rich sauce of reduced stock and red wine are accompanied by grilled slabs of Polenta. And there is a platter of perfectly grilled Radicchio di Treviso, dramatically bitter/sweet, lovely white and garnet-red with a crisp smoky encrustation from the grill and exuding its own delicious juices. My companion waxed enthusiastic over a platter of eel baked with bay leaf (a house specialty), garnished with grilled vegetables. A Michele Chiarlo “New Style” ’95 Barolo accompanied nicely, sufficiently complex but user-friendly for Barolo: one way to go! And then there was a Caramelized Apple Cake served with a spoonful of Vanilla Gelato. Coffee and a glass of Grappa di Veneto seem a fitting conclusion.

FIASCHETTERIA TOSCANA  Salizzada San Giovanni Crisostomo, 5719   Tel.:041-52-85-281  Closed in August (or whenever you're showing up) Open Mon, Wed-Sun. Our dinner, including tip and wines: $95 for two. Some reviews and comments:

The restaurant has a sort of web site:
http://www.fiaschetteriatoscana.it

Some restaurants around Italy offer a "signature dish".  If you order their specialty of the house, they provide one of these plates.  Dozens of fine dining establishments around Italy offer these.

 

 




Our two star Hotel Dolomiti, just around the corner from the Railroad Station, proved to be comfortable, spotlessly clean with a polite, friendly English speaking staff and eminently affordable. I would much rather squander my vacation money on fine dining and entertainment. So little time is spent in the Hotel on either side of a gloriously deep and restful sleep.

HOTEL DOLOMITI, Cannaregio, Calle Priuli, 72-73 Book on line: dolomiti@ciaovenezia.com

The location of the Hotel gives me the chance to make a fast getaway on the train for an hour ride to Verona and VinItaly, that incredible gathering of over three thousand (!) wine producers from throughout Italy and beyond. I’m awestruck by the expanse of pavilions, easily covering the extent of several football fields.  Any serious student of Italian Wine should attend this fabulous Fair at least once in a lifetime.

The days tasting introduced me to several of the producers that we feature at Weimax Wines & Spirits. The charming and friendly Pietro Ratti of Renato Ratti presented an impeccable series of Piemontese wines, (currently represented at Weimax by the fine, Cabernet influenced 2001 Villa Pattono, the 2003 Barbera "Torriglione" and two exceptional Barolos.) Tasters are four-deep at the Gaja table (oh well!). A warm reception from the charming and stunningly beautiful Elena Walch a producer in Alto Adige more than made up. The wines of G.D.Vajra showed well with their angular, nicely structured style.  And who’s this angling toward the table for a tasting but the inimitable Randall Grahm of Bonny Doon Vineyards! I had the pleasure of an extended conversation with young Stefano Chiarlo of Azienda Vitivinicola Michele Chiarlo, the producer of last night’s Barolo, whose Nivole (Moscato d’Asti) is such a hit with our customers at Weimax. At the Allegrini presentation, I was blown away by the Valpolicella "big, easy, juicy (almost Zin-like), as nice as it gets!" The current release is available at Weimax. The 1997 Amarone were among the most exciting wines tasted: Masi's 1997 Amarone Sergio Alighieri "Serego Vaio" (still available at Weimax) and the 1997 Amarone of Le Ragose.  We have the 1995 Le Ragose Amarone in stock at Weimax. I must have tasted well over 250 wines that day!


Back in Venice, the days tasting, grueling but exhilarating, whetted the appetite for a major dining experience. We selected Vini da Gigio, much touted in a review as an exceptional dining value. At the end of the meal were drinking to that!   This time the opening Prosecco was just the right note for an antipasto plate of perfectly grilled vegetables (Venetians have a way with this!) and one of the signature dishes of Venetian cuisine: Sarde in Saor. Fresh sardines are sautéed and marinated for a day or two in white wine vinegar along with a kind of white onion “marmalade” studded with a few plumped white raisins and pine nuts. To accompany our main course we opt for a ’95 Barbera of Elio Altare “Vigna Larigi”, rich, deep and beautifully developed, one of the finest Barbera wine I’ve ever tasted.   Altare's wine paired beautifully with a Risotto di Frutti di Mare, possibly the best in memory. The excitement built with the arrival of an Osso Bucco in a sauce of remarkable finesse. Across the table my companion was presented with another specialty of Venetian cuisine: braised local duck.  Quite unlike any duck we know here stateside these small darkly flavored birds remind more of squab. The sauce is equally dark and incredibly flavorsome. I asked for a wine-glass and poured some Barbera to offer to the chef.  Momentarily our cuisiniere appeared, a tall, stunningly beautiful young blond woman in gleaming whites smiling broadly with glass raised in friendly salute. A very fruity grappa, reminiscent of pear eau-de-vie, completed the repast.

VINI DA GIGIO, Cannaregio 3628A, Fondamenta San Felice. Tel.: 041-528-5140 Closed Monday and Tuesday. Our meal $65 for two excluding wine. Booking recommended. 
http://www.vinidagigio.com/

   


Photos by Gerald Weisl, who visited in July 2005.
This place was excellent...be sure to arrive hungry!



There are virtually no long, straight lines in Venice, no “horizon”, no “grid”. It wreaks a bit of havoc with your sense of perspective, your apprehension of space. Sunshine reflected every which way from undulating water bathes everything in a shimmering light. Colors are somehow more vibrant. Standing in the Vaporetto (the Canal public transportation) you develop a keen sense of balance as it rocks gently through the water.


At the Accademia, the museum showcase of the masters of Venetian Painting, you get a sense that the artists created their canvasses in this flood of wonderful color and light. The human body twists and turns in unlikely but elegantly balanced positions. Figures are crowded into the frame. Angels twist and contort in mid-air. There is no “grid”, no “vanishing point”. But the best artists (Titian, Tinteretto, Bellini, Carpaccio, Tiepolo, Veronese) make prefect sense of it all. Colors are brilliant (especially now that so many masterpieces have been recently cleaned). Everything is bathed in a wonderful light. You have a sense of the wealth, the exuberance, the self-confidence of the citizens of the first great modern democratic city.

This special aesthetic is reflected in the selection of 20th Century art and sculpture at the Guggenheim Museum. How many museums are there where virtually everything in the collection is a stunning masterpiece?!


Entrance and Sculpture Garden


A Calder Stabile on the rear terrace overlooking the Canal

All the walking you do, and the onslaught of visual delight, gives you a sharpened appetite as the evening draws near. Tonight we dine at I’lncontro run by a Sardinian chef who turns out hearty, yet imaginative and sophisticated cuisine. You'll want to bring a healthy appetite. I have a perfectly simple but marvelous first course: a “Rabbit Salad,” pulled apart shreds of succulent rabbit meat tossed in a tasty vinaigrette with scallions and Italian parsley, served over a bed of mixed bitter and sweet greens. My companion has something quite extraordinary, especially for a Californian. For some strange reason horsemeat is taboo in California but not so in the Veneto.  For this appetizer, horse meat is dry cured in the manner of Italian salami and is then shredded very finely and tossed very simply with vinegar, olive oil, salt and freshly ground pepper. Intriguing and absolutely delicious! Everyone was ordering the specialty pasta course of the evening and we followed suit. A marvelous tangle of house-made fettuccine in a sauce created from the puree of green asparagus, cream and grated Pecorino Romano cheese. Fantastic! Hearty main dishes followed: a tender chunk of beef long-simmered in stock and red wine and a Fricassee of Rabbit garnished with tiny white onions and spring peas. The repast was accompanied by two wines of Sardinian producer Argiolas: a dry, delightful Vermentino (white) and the from the varietal Monica a full, robust and quite deep red wine, reminiscent in a way of both the Spanish Tempranillo and the French Syrah.
The "piece de resistance" at L'Incontro, however, and a dish that they're justly famous for, is "Roast Suckling Pig."  The pig is encrusted with a mix of wild herbs and wood-fire roasted until the meat is unbelievably succulent and "fork tender" accompanied by the crisp, herbed crackling from the skin.  The pig comes out of the oven at about 9:00 P.M. so book a later reservation. They only prepare this signature dish two or three times a week so call in advance.  Following all that simple but rich dining fare, be sure to have a glass of that inimitable Sardinian digestive Mirto based on an infusion of myrtle berries with just the right touch of sweetness. Mirto, by the way, is available at Weimax: $26.99 for the 750 ml.

L’INCONTRO Dorsoduro 3062, Rio Tera Canal  Tel.: 041-522-2404.  Closed Monday. Booking advisable. Our meal, wine included: $80 for two.


The friendly staff at L'Incontro.

 



A day of sightseeing in the area of St Marks and the Doges Palace brought us to a small scaled but marvelous gem: the Scuola San Giorgio degli Schiavoni with its wonderful paintings of St Jerome and St.George by Carpaccio. Throughout Venice we are guided with a sure hand by the virtually indispensable little book “Venice” a Knopf Guide.

We broke a cardinal rule of thumb and selected a promising-looking restaurant in this heavily touristed area. Desultory preparations of Venetian classics arrived along with a couple and their teen-age daughter at the next table. The wife pulled out her cell phone and gushed on in a loud voice on matters only a mother could bear listening to. The struggling waiter brought first courses but the woman rose suddenly. “I don’t like this place, I don’t like this food. Pay the bill dear, we’re getting outta here!” We later realized that our waiter had grossly padded our bill. At all costs, avoid restaurants in heavily touristed areas.


Another day at VinItaly brought further tasting pleasures. The wines of Isole e Olena all showed splendidly. There was the ’98 Chianti Classico (currently available at Weimax) “smoke, red fruits, citrus; a bit of grip but such a nice mouthful of wine; Bravo!”, the ’98 Cepparello (ex cask) fuller, with even better structure than the ’97, the ’97 Syrah (a few bottles available at Weimax) “in a class by itself, very dry, very full, very Italian” and the Vin Santo (available at Weimax). At the Venica (Collio) tables I am blown away by the ’96 Merlot: “Serious stuff, Merlot fruit, spice and oak explode out of the glass! A layered, big, luscious mouthful, easy tannins.” Other standouts of the day were the Barolos of Marcarini, Cavallotto and, of course, Vietti. At the tables of Villa Pillo (Chianti) John Dyson, also owner of Sonoma County's Williams Selyem winery, related how his Vin Santo of tiny production had been gushed over by a couple of prominent wine writers. Everyone had to have a taste but wouldn’t say “boo” to his other fine wines. (A few bottles of Syrah and Merlot are available at Weimax). The day was capped with a visit with the elegant Princess Coralia Pignatelli della Leonessa of Castell’in Villa (Chianti). I confessed that I had little faith in the ageability of Chianti Classico. With a wry smile she poured a taste of her ’77. “Extraordinary, at the point of perfection, notes of tar but complex and rich, like an old Vega Sicilia; a great experience!”  A bottle or two of the 1971 is still available at the shop as of August, 2005.

Back in Venice, a break in showery weather brought warm, spring-like weather that called for somewhat lighter dining. We selected Alla Zucca (the Pumpkin) a restaurant with a somewhat vegetarian bias. We started off with a creamy Duck Liver Pate and rounds of crisp Italian bread. The pumpkin of the restaurant's name is dissimilar to our slightly sweety pumpkin, more akin to French strains that are “dryer”, more “meaty.” The house specialty is a thick puree of pumpkin encased in a light, flaky pastry crust. Delicious! My companion enjoyed a lasagna fashioned from house made pasta, ricotta, cream and vegetables. We both opted for a nicely flattened out pork chop still on the bone sautéed and finished with stock and Marsala. We enjoyed a savory bottle of Roero, a Nebbiolo-based wine of Malvira, the producer of our sweet Brachetto, a favorite of ours at Weimax.

ALLA  ZUCCA, Santa Croce 1762, Ponte del Megio, Tel.: 041-524-1570. Closed Sun. Booking advisable.  Dinner, wine included, $80 - $100.


Previous visits to Venice had had included dinners at the bustling, inexpensive Trattoria Alle Burchielle on the Fondamenta Burchielle facing the southern corner of Piazzale Rome across the canal . I revisited the trattoria this year and marveled at this little unspoiled gem. True, the wine list is sub-par, mainly a few innocuous co-op wines from the region. Although discovered by some smart tourists, the trattoria is patronized mainly by the locals. In the next room twelve convivial, handsome gondoliers were having one great time of it. At an adjoining table several older couples on a budget were celebrating a birthday in fine fashion. A nicely flavored dish of Pasta in a Sauce of Calamari Ink preceded a succulent plate of Grilled Monk Fish and a plate of Mixed Grilled Frutti di Mare. An uncomplicated, fruity glass of Grappa finished the meal. This is certainly one of the best inexpensive Trattorias in all of Venice. Closed Monday.


Bob's Burchielle seafood.

For a map to this place:  CLICK HERE

For a look at the upper limit of Venetian Glass Blowing Art, visit the shop at the colonnade under the Corriere Museum at the end of the Piazza San Marco opposite the Duomo.




The people of Venice are very “gentile”, very polite, similar to Parisians in that respect. But unlike Paris, their sexuality seems very discrete, almost repressed. Back at the Hotel I am thumbing through some notes and come upon a hastily scribbled sheet of paper “Te Amo!” (“I love you!”), a note from our full-figured, full-bosomed maid who, well…

Tomorrow, it’s off to Rome and further cultural and gastronomic adventures.

*****
More when Bob gets around to writing it....Watch this space.

GERALD VISITS VENICE

We spent a Sunday one summer's day in July in Venice.  With our friend Alessandra Dorigo leading the 'tour,' we had a wonderful day being tourists.

Alessandra insisted with take the train.  This would allow us to get very close to the main part of Venezia, but be certain your train arrives at the Stazione Santa Lucia and not Mestre.  You can then hop onto a water taxi or the ferry boat and go where you like, or hike over the bridge and around town.




It's probably far more romantic at night after a few bottles of wine.


Keep Venice Clean.

 


Newspapers.


You can buy a pouch of seeds from a vendor for one Euro and then feed the birds.

 


If you can find the location of the Naranzaria, you can have a really good glass of wine and a nice plate of Venetian sushi.



They have a nice array of wines and the place is a bit off the tourist track.  On a hot summer afternoon, we found it well-shaded and mildly breezy...very refreshing!


An American Sushi Expert found the Venetian version to be very good.

A great gelateria near the train station...don't miss it!


GELATERIA ALASKA
1159 Calle Larga dei Bari
Carlo Pistacchi is the gelato meister at this place...
He's a fan of Jamaica, so you might hear some reggae music.
Don't miss the ginger gelato!!!  It is amazingly good.

 

TALIA & BRUCE DINE IN VENICE


An interesting web site of Venice Info:
http://www.venicebanana.com/eng/index.htm

NY TIMES / FODORS - A Page About Venetian Culinary Specialties.
http://travel2.nytimes.com/fodors/top/features/travel/destinations/europe/italy/venice/fdrs_feat_163_8.html?n=Top%2FFeatures%2FTravel%2FDestinations%2FEurope%2FItaly%2FVenice

 

winepour.gif (12696 bytes)Wine Tasting Today

TO INQUIRE ABOUT A WINEgerald@weimax.com
Copyright © 1999 WEIMAX April 23,  2014